History

History Curriculum Map

Intent

‘Sankofa’ is a metaphorical symbol from the Akan culture of Ghana; it translates as ‘go back and get it’. It is represented by a mythical bird who is moving forward while simultaneously looking back. It’s is an apt concept for our curriculum philosophy. Sankofa suggests that knowledge of the past is a crucial prerequisite to move forward successfully into the future. We believe that history has the potential to empower our students as it interacts with both their intellect and identities. It therefore is not just about academic knowledge; it is potentially transformative. We have designed a curriculum that explicitly centres on these two key pillars; students developing a greater sense of self and the critical importance of historical literacy to navigate the present and the future. We want our students to be energised and empowered by our curriculum choices. We have therefore centred our curriculum on topics, peoples and ideas which we believe are important and historically significant for students at CJM who come from a range of backgrounds, who live in and around NW10, but are exposed to an ever globalised world. Careful thought and consideration has been given not only to what we teach, but also to how and why we present these topics on the curriculum. History should nourish and develop intellect, cultural competence and the critical consciousness of students. Diverse histories taught with academic rigour and integrity are at the core of our curriculum. We believe this is an act of doing justice to history as scholars and as a form of social justice. We want our students to gain cultural capital but also importantly cultural confidence in their own identities and stories. Students will develop an understanding of how history informs our sense of identity and place in the world through studying a range of periods, perspectives and peoples. The curriculum also supports the disciplinary knowledge of history. Our subject is rooted in the use of sources; traces of the past, as evidence to substantiate the claims we can make about the past. Students therefore learn how to read sources critically whilst appreciating their positive value and understand how to use evidence to make claims, arguments and sophisticated judgements. We hope that students develop a passion for history, a respect and understanding for all people and deeper understanding of the human spirit.

 

Implementation

Year 7
Term 1 2 3
 

Topic/

Enquiry question

 

Religion in Ancient Africa

 

Empress Matilda

 

The Science of Medieval

 

Challenges to Royal Authority

 

Mughal India

 

 

The English Reformation

 

 

Content focus 

 

This enquiry introduces students to the key methods of the historian; using sources, traces of the past, as evidence to make historical claims and arguments. This is foundational to the discipline of history. Historical literacy is built through key principles such as chronological understanding. Rather than learning concepts in abstract, we learn them in the context of the ancient empire of Axum in the 4th Century. We use sources which evidence King Ezana’s conversion to Christianity and explore how buildings like the Lalibella churches can also be used by historians to make learn about the ancient African kingdoms.

 

This enquiry explores the politics of power in Norman England through the lens of Empress Matilda. Rather than focusing on the events of 1066, the signifance and impact of the Norman Conquest is explored through the life of Matilda. Students develop their understanding of historical enquiry and causation by exploring the concept of legitimacy and gender in this context. Interpretations are introduced through the work of Historian Helen Castor. Students build their understanding that historians create histories rather than simply know history.

 

 

This enquiry expands the cultural and geographical scope of medieval history. Students explore the positive relationship between science and Islam in the medieval period.  The discoveries of Ibn Al Haytham and mathematics of Al Khwarizmi are highlighted. The role of the individual as agents of change and the legacy of their work is charted. The significance of the House of Wisdom as a centre of culture and learning in the cosmopolitan city of Bagdad is another key feature.

 

This enquiry focuses on some of the key power struggles in medieval England.  The concept of sovereignty and the changing reality of kingship and power is explored through King Henry II and has struggles with the Church, King John and the Barons, 1215 and Richard III and the People, 1381. Students gain an appreciation of the dynamic nature and extent of change and continuity.

 

This enquiry builds on the global knowledge of the medieval world and beyond. Students are introduced the Mughal dynasty and the feats of their rule. The role of women in the Mughal Court is a key theme which is a valuable comparison to the power struggles of Empress Matilda.  Paintings are used as a key Sources, building on the methods of a historian established at the in the first enquiry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This enquiry starts with exploring the spiritual vibrancy of Tudor England and examines the impact on spiritual life as well political impact of the Reformation. The role and importance of the Church and faith in the daily lives of people is explored. The work of Professor Eamon Duffy’s ‘The Voices of Morebath is used to highlight the local impact of religious change

This enquiry is foundational to the curriculum. Knowledge of the impact of the Reformation feeds into several enquiries across the key stages.

 

 

Year 8
Term 1 2 3
 

Enquiry question

 

Native American civilisations and the clash with Euro-America

 

The Trans-Atlantic Slave trade and New World Slavery

 

 

 

The Match Women Strike, 1888

 

 

The impact of the Abolition of Slavery

 

 

Disenfranchisement and struggles for suffrage

 

 

The 1976  Grunwick dispute

Enquiry content   American history is a significant feature in the curriculum. Therefore, we want students to have knowledge of the full scope of the American past by starting with the histories of the indigenous First Nations of America and their ancient civilisations. The subsequent impact of European settlement and conquest and Native American resistance to the policies of annihilation and assimilation are explored up to the early 20th century.

 

 

 

Historical knowledge is of the Slave trade and slavery is critical for an understanding of historic and contemporary manifestations of anti-black racism. The rich reality of African kingdoms and international relations before the dawn of the slave trade are illustrated to demonstrate the absence of ideas of racial hierarchy.  The terror of the middle passage, the subsequent construction of race and racial hierarchies are explored.   The authorities and economics of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the multifaceted resistance of Africans is charted. The activism is the Match Women has been highlighted by the work of historian Dr. Louise Raw in her ground-breaking book ‘Striking a Light’. In this enquiry students build on their understanding of how historians construct historical interpretations through exploring the motivations behind the work of Dr. Raw as a scholar-activist. The histories of the industrial revolution and urbanisation, the development of factory system ,19th century Irish migration to England and he socio-economic condition of the working class are situated in the context of the activism of Match Women against their employers, the owners of the Bryant and May Match factory in the East End.

 

 

 

The British abolition movement worked and campaigned and asked the critical question if enslaved Africans were not ‘Men and Brothers and women and sisters’? Placing the immorality of the dehumanisation of enslavement at the fore, this was in stark contrast to the contemporary ideals of British liberty. The activism of abolitionists and resistance of enslaved Africans is explored. Students evaluate the extent of change the abolition of transatlantic slavery made to the economic and political lives of formerly enslaved Africans. The school parliament is a key feature of the school community. This enquiry supports and develops the political literacy of students by charting the struggles to create a more inclusive parliamentary political system.  Students study Catholic exclusion which builds on from their understanding of the Reformation as a spiritual change, by developing an understanding of the political consequences. The extension of the franchise as a response to protest and organising movements of the Chartist and the female suffragettes are explored. Our local history study centres on the Grunwick dispute between the owners of the Grunwick film processing plant in Chapter Road, Willesden and the grievances of its predominantly South Asian female workforce. The causes of the strike are assessed, and students develop their understanding of the relative importance of causes. The role and activism of Jayaben Desai is a key feature. The concept of solidarity is evaluated in the context of the involvement of the wider Trade Union movement. The intersection of ethnicity, gender and class are explored as key themes in the enquiry. Students consider the significance of this local history and how can be presented as public history.

 

Year 9
Term 1 2 3
 

Enquiry question

 

Black British struggles for racial justice

1945-2012

 

 

The 1976 Grunwick dispute

 

The fragility of Weimar and the Rise of the Nazi Party

 

Facing History unit: The Holocaust and Human Behaviour

 

AQA GCSE:

Elizabethan England c.1553-1603

Enquiry content  

This enquiry builds on the Year 8 enquiries which establish understanding around the political construction of race and the establishment of racialised colonial hierarchies. The experiences of Black British people are explored through assessing the perspective of black colonial citizenship during World War II and the expectations and experiences of the Windrush generation. Nearby local history is charted through the Notting Hill Riots through to the Mangrove 9. The impact of the murder of

murder and case of Stephen Lawrence and the significance of the McPherson Report is evaluated.

 

Our local history study centres on the Grunwick dispute between the owners of the Grunwick film processing plant in Chapter Road, Willesden and the grievances of its predominantly South Asian female workforce. The causes of the strike are assessed, and students develop their understanding of the relative importance of causes. The role and activism of Jayaben Desai is a key feature. The concept of solidarity is evaluated in the context of the involvement of the wider Trade Union movement. The intersection of ethnicity, gender and class are explored as key themes in the enquiry. Students consider the significance of this local history and how can be presented as public history.

 

Students study key events figures from the Weimar period and reflect on why it did not last. Through this topic critical reflection on the challenges that face a democracy and the impact of individual choices on society as a whole are explored. The impact of the Treaty of Versailles is assessed in relation to the rise of the Nazi Party. The ideas of the Party are explored and the impact of the economic depression is assessed as an enabling factor. Students develop their conceptual understanding of causation in this enquiry.

 

 

Facing History’s innovative pedagogical approaches are used in this unit to engage in the study of the holocaust through the lens of human behaviour. Students start by making the essential connection between history and themselves and recognised the agency and impact of choices. Decision making in times of injustice is a key theme that features. A survey of Jewish History from Abraham, global migration and life in Europe before 1918 is explored.

The escalation of anti-Semitism with the rise of Nazism brings student’s knowledge from the previous enquiry together. The ideas, mechanisms which enabled the Holocaust to occur are evaluated.

 

We begin the GCSE content with the some of the key principles and connecting content established in KS3 (the impact of the Reformation, challenges to royal authority and the intersection of gender and power). Elizabeth’s court and the difficulties of a female ruler are explored. Religious tensions are explored through impact of the Elizabethan Settlement, Mary Queen of Scots and Conflict with Spain. The second aspect of this unit is on social and cultural history. The cultural renaissance of the ‘Golden Age’ and increasing standards of living are explored and contrasted with the rise in poverty. The impact and effectiveness of Elizabethan policies to support uplift and curb poverty is evaluated.

 

 

Year 10
Term 1 2 3  
GCSE Topic Migration Empire and the Peoples

c. 790-2000s

AQA GCSE:

Conflict and Tension in Asia 1950-1975

AQA GCSE:

Conflict and Tension in Asia 1950-1975

AQA GCSE:

Elizabethan England c.1568-1603

Topic content Developing historical knowledge and literacy of the forces that have shaped modern Britain is critical. This course develops of the ethics and themes of the curriculum and brings together the foundational knowledge that students develop is KS3.  This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of how the identity of the people of Britain has been shaped by their interaction with the wider world. It will consider invasions and conquests. It will also study the country’s relationship with Europe and the wider world. It will consider the ebb and flow of peoples into and out of Britain and evaluate their motives and achievements. It considers the causes, impact and legacy of Empire upon the ruled and the ruling in the context of Britain’s acquisition and retreat from Empire. This course takes particular and influences at work behind the scenes of the significant events that have shaped the changes and continuities of the British Past. The expanse of the ‘long second millennium’ is digested through using the lens of the following key themes: migration, survival, liberty, business, empire and identity.

 

This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of different states and individuals and the ideologies they represented. It considers the role of nationalist movements in causing and sustaining conflict. It focuses on the causes and events of the Cold War in Asia and seeks to show how and why conflict occurred and why it proved difficult to resolve the tensions which arose. This study also considers the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change, as well as how they were affected by and influenced international relations. The Korean war and Vietnam war are both studied in depth. This unit compliments the understanding students gain from the America period study, 1920-1973, as students gain an appreciation of the American way, its ideals and political culture. Some key topics such as the Second Red Scare and President Johnson’s Great Society policy programme intersect across both units.

 

 

This topic, covered in year 9, is revisited

 

 

 

Year 11
Term 1 2 3  
GCSE Topic AQA GCSE:

Conflict and Tension in Asia 1950-1975

 

AQA GCSE:

Migration Empire and the Peoples

c. 790-200s

AQA GCSE:

America 1920-1975

 

Topic content

 

 

This topic, covered in year 10, is revisited

 

(2020 only, this topic will then be on the Year 10 curriculum)

Developing historical literacy of the forces that have shaped modern Britain is critical. This course develops the ethics and themes of the curriculum and brings together the foundational knowledge that students develop is KS3.  This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of how the identity of the people of Britain has been shaped by their interaction with the wider world. It will consider invasions and conquests. It will also study the country’s relationship with Europe and the wider world. It will consider the ebb and flow of peoples into and out of Britain and evaluate their motives and achievements. It considers the causes, impact and legacy of Empire upon the ruled and the ruling in the context of Britain’s acquisition and retreat from Empire. This course takes particular and influences at work behind the scenes of the significant events that have shaped the changes and continuities of the British Past. The expanse of the ‘long second millennium’ is digested through using the lens of the following key themes: migration, survival, liberty, business, empire and identity.

 

 

 

 

 

This period study focuses on the development of the USA during a turbulent half century of change. It was a period of opportunity and inequality – when some Americans lived the ‘American Dream’ whilst others grappled with the nightmare of poverty, discrimination and prejudice. Students will study the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of these two developments and the role ideas played in bringing about change. They will also look at the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and the impact the developments had on them.  Key concepts such as consumerism, racism, popular culture, economic depression and feminism are studied. This course also provides a foundation for study of American history at A Level.

 

Year 12
Term 1 2 3
  Edexcel A Level History: In search of the American Dream: the USA, 1917–96
Unit  1

Content

The quest for civil rights

 

Race can be seen as the litmus test for American democracy. As the title of the course is ‘In Search of the American Dream, we evaluate how African Americans responded to the ‘Dream Deferred.’ This unit explores the African American experience using the modes of PERSIA (politics, economics, society, culture, ideology and area). We use new historical interpretations of this history and take the view of the ‘long civil rights movement’ in recognition that a freedom struggle has been a constant feature of the African American experience. We explore varying approaches and ideas in quest for freedom from legal challenges, to direct action and the Black Power movement. This unit also affords the opportunity to consider the impact of the 1960s as a period of struggle for other minority groups by assessing the reasons for, and nature of, Native American and Hispanic American campaigns and the emergence of the gay rights movement.

 

The political landscape

The political landscape of America from 1917-1980 is charted in this topic. There first key focus is on the changing nature presidency as an institution by assessing the reasons for the rise and decline of Republicanism to 1933; the influence of Roosevelt; changing styles of presidential leadership, 1945–72; a decline in confidence, 1968–80. Key influences on the political landscape such as rugged individualism to New Deal ideas in the 1920s and 30s; the Red Scares and anti-communism, 1917–80; liberalism, counterculture and the resurgence of American conservativism, c1960–80 is explored. The final key focus is impact of war on domestic politics: the reasons for a return to ‘normalcy’ and a commitment to isolationism, 1917–41; US emergence as a Cold War superpower from 1941; the impact of involvement in Korea and Vietnam.

Women

 

This topic charts the changing position of women in the period 1917-1980. The impact of political changes on the economic and social lives of women is assessed in relation to contemporary ideals of femininity, womanhood, citizenship and feminism. Key periods of study include the roaring twenties, the Great Depression and New Deal, the Second World war and the post-war emergence of the women’s liberation movement.  The reality of the diversity of experience of women from different demographics is a key ethic used the show the range of and relativity of change.

 

 

 

 

 

Immigration

 

Americans have come from every corner of the globe. This topic evaluates the impact of immigration during the late 19th century and early 20th century. Students study the significance of American colonial expansion and the impact of American progress and the concept of manifest destiny in KS3. This topic therefore builds on their understanding on how the USA was subsequently shaped culturally and politically as a result of immigration. Whilst the ideal of the melting pot nation is often propagated the reality of racism, and anti-immigration sentiments are explored. This topic assesses tensions between the economic need for immigration and political and cultural realities faced by immigrants.

 

The Reagan Presidency

The Regan presidency is a watershed for many reasons. By this point the key forces and factors and issues which have shaped America by the later part of the 20th century have been explored. Students now therefore have a firm foundation to explore how the conservative counterrevolution was surmounted and the impact of Regan’s economic and social policies in changing the consensus in American political culture. The legacy of Reaganism is explored by assessing the impact of the rightward shift in national politics up to 1996.

 

Culture and society

Culture has historically been one of America’s biggest global exports. The ways in which a distinctly American popular culture has emerged is assessed with a focus on the technological innovations which enabled the message of culture to be transmitted by key media. The influence of popular culture and the news media, the social impact of cinema popular music and radio are explored in the first part of this unit. The cultural shift and creation of a more conformist national cultural which television inculcated is assessed. The intersection of culture and politics is also explored.

 

Year 12
Term 1 2 3
Unit 2 South Africa, 1948–94: from apartheid state to ‘rainbow nation’

Unit one and two are linked by the common theme of a search for rights and freedoms. This unit therefore complements this theme which runs across unit one. Studying two different countries allows students to develop a greater understanding of both similarities and differences in the search for greater rights, freedoms and equality in the twentieth century world. This unit comprises a study in depth of South Africa during its transition from white minority rule to the free elections of 1994, a long, and at times, dramatic process in which South Africa changed from an apartheid state into a multi-racial democracy. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the creation and consolidation of the apartheid regime by the National Party and the response and methods used by their political opponents in the struggle to overthrow apartheid, as well social, economic and cultural changes that accompanied this process.

 

 

Year 13
Term 1 2 3
Unit 3 Ireland and the Union, c1774–1923

This unit has two breadth studies, Irish nationalism: from agitation to civil war and British reaction from resistance to acceptance and six depth studies. Together, the breadth and depth topics explore the Irish struggle for constitutional change, and the ways in which the Irish economy and society changed and their impact on mainland Britain. This was a difficult period in the development of Irish society and for Anglo-Irish relations, involving passion, tensions and commitment to different causes that were in many ways’ irreconcilable, and an outcome that, by 1923, left many dissatisfied and eager for further change. Rather than study these topics separately we study them chronologically to get a fuller perspective of the period. The breath studies therefore have been planned to include the depth studies. The depth enquiries also include development of primary Source analysis as this is a key feature of this paper.

 

Unit 4 Coursework

The purpose of this coursework is to enable students to develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of interpretations of history in a chosen question, problem or issue as part of an independently researched assignment. The coursework is therefore a development of this skill from Unit 1.

The focus is on understanding the nature and purpose of the work of the historian. Students will be required to form a critical view based on relevant reading on the question, problem or issue. They will also be specifically required to analyse, explain and evaluate the interpretations of three historians. The coursework question is linked to the content of Unit 2; the reasons for the end of formal apartheid in 1994 which supports development of students understanding of this content by combining all three key assessment objectives together in this unit.

 

 

Impact

We believe that our curriculum supports our students in their journey in becoming thoughtful, confident young scholars. The curriculum is designed to nurture and support academic achievement and empowerment through knowledge and critical thinking.  Students build historical literacy which enables them to have both cultural capital, cultural confidence and cultural appreciation.  The History curriculum therefore supports the holistic education of young people as confident young thinkers and informed agents of change.  Students enjoy the subject, which enables them to commit to the academic demands of History and to thrive in their external examinations.  Each year group is assessed by examination during the school’s two assessment weeks at the midpoint and at the end of the academic year. Students are supported to enable them to make effective progress from KS3 to GCSE, and from GCSE to A Level.  Summative and formative feedback is given to students throughout the year.